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Latest
  • Classically Progressive in Yarra Valley

    It’s hard to mount an argument against the Yarra Valley being Victoria’s most important wine region. It is the home to some of the most hallowed names. It is also the cradle for some of the country’s finest winemaking talent, and for a zone with a distinctly classical feel, it is notably progressive, with vignerons both fledgling and established shaping a new future. Over the years, the Yarra has provided a wealth of YGOW finalists. This year’s Top 50 includes DCB Wine’s Chris Bendle and Tim Perrin from Oakridge.

  • Geelong Redux

    On the surface, it’s easy to compare the Geelong wine region with the Mornington Peninsula. While Mornington catches the light with a good dose of glamour, Geelong has a quieter resolve and greater subregional diversity, which makers are exploiting to exciting effect. This year’s Top 50 features Mulline’s Ben Mullen, Empire of Dirt’s Natasha Webster and Micro Wines’ Jonathan Ross.

  • The Groundswell of Tasmania

    Tasmania has long been regarded as a place of great viticultural potential – the promised land for pinot noir, chardonnay and aromatic whites. But it is only in the last decade or so that the potential has been realised consistently and broadly across varieties and producers. The strength of Tasmanian wine today is underlined by this year’s Top 50, with six makers amongst the finalists, Mewstone, Quiet Mutiny, Sailor Seeks Horse, Small Island Wines, Two Tonne Tasmania and Wellington & Wolfe.

  • Vale Vaughn Dell

    Last Wednesday was a very sad day. A sad day for the wine industry, and an indescribably tragic day for the family and friends of Vaughn Dell, vigneron of Sinapius vineyard in Pipers Brook, Tasmania. Vaughn died of a suspected heart condition on the 20th of May 2020. He was 39. Vaughn and his wife…