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Yangarra Estate, McLaren Vale Michael Lane

Top Vineyards

Viticulturist Michael Lane and winemaker Peter Fraser have worked hand in glove at McLaren Vale’s Yangarra Estate for 20 years, steering the wines to ever-greater heights through a program that puts vineyard front and centre. Fraser is one of this country’s most skilled makers – no argument – but the long-term quality goals the pair had for the estate were always built on reinvigorating their soil and returning a natural harmony to the site. Today, Lane meticulously manages nearly 90 hectares of vines to A-grade biodynamic standards, working across a suite of Southern Rhône varieties, with grenache taking the lead.

Yangarra Estate now has over 88 hectares under vine. The first plantings date back to 1946, with additions in ’98 and ’99. After the purchase of the site by Jackson Family Wines, further plantings in 2009 and ’16 expanded the range to cover the key varieties of the Southern Rhône – bourboulenc, clairette, grenache blanc, piquepoul, roussanne, viognier, carignan, cinsault, counoise, grenache, mourvèdre and shiraz – with other climate-apt Mediterranean varieties in the pipeline.

New vines are also planted on a 300° north-west angle to generally maximise sunlight on the fruit zone but provide shade during the hottest parts of the day, a simple enough solution that is one part of a strategy to manage increasingly hot seasons.

The property actually extends over almost double the area under vine, with 170 hectares of land, which Lane has been managing organically and biodynamically since 2008, with A-grade certification granted in 2012 (ACO). Yangarra have also been certified with Sustainable Wine Growing Australia since 2013.

“Biodynamics is a tool that we use,” says Lane. “Certification allows us to build trust with our customers. We take a very practical approach to our farming based on technical know-how, ideas from permaculture and biological farming that bring together a system that we believe produces the best out of our site. We continue to learn, evolve and fine-tune these practices every year.”

Lane maintains a permanent interrow grass sward to control weeds, with those grasses and any under-vine weed growth partly managed by rotational winter grazing of sheep. Beehives are employed to aid with flowering both of vines and to encourage biodiversity, and a significant onsite program sees 1,000 cubic metres of compost and organic matter – including grape marc – applied to the vineyard each year.

Lane is also focused on working on restoring waterways and native populations to return some natural harmony to the site.
Yangarra's viticulturist, Michael Lane.

Lane is also focused on working on restoring waterways and native populations to return some natural harmony to the site. “Being a biodynamic producer, sustainability is the cornerstone to the way we farm,” he says, “but we continue to work towards improving and enhancing the biodiversity, including flora and fauna… and further develop our existing natural corridors and water courses. This will work to improve our already growing biodiversity, attracting beneficial insects and animals.”

Microbat boxes have also been built to aid in controlling insect populations. This not only provides sanctuary to a native species whose habitat is threatened, but being voracious consumers, they’re able to consume half their body weight in insects. It’s a creative way of solving two problems, one localised, and one that has larger implications. Lane is also trialling drones to discourage birds as the grapes ripen, as well as attracting predatory birds to act as natural deterrents.

Microbat boxes have also been built to aid in controlling insect populations. This not only provides sanctuary to a native species whose habitat is threatened, but being voracious consumers, they’re able to consume half their body weight in insects.

As Yangarra is an old vineyard, Lane is engaged in updating infrastructure elements, including the removal of treated pine posts to be replaced with metal ones. New vines are also planted on a 300° north-west angle to generally maximise sunlight on the fruit zone but provide shade during the hottest parts of the day, a simple enough solution that is one part of a strategy to manage increasingly hot seasons.

“Climate change has already had an impact on the way we farm our Vineyard,” Lane says. “Our cultural practices have been modified to suit the changes in climate with a greater focus on the varietal selection, our planting orientation and water management.”

Lane puts down much of the success of Yangarra’s wines to the symbiotic relationship he and Fraser have, as well as the latitude the Jackson family have given them to pursue vineyard best practices.

“I’m proud to have been involved in the shaping of Yangarra Estate vineyard over the past 20 years,” says Lane, “with the support of the Jackson Family, knowing that they trust and encourage the way we manage the vineyard… and having worked with Peter Fraser for the past 20 years, we have developed a unique working relationship with an extensive mutual understanding of what is required of us to live up to the expectation of the wines we want to produce.”

Michael Lane with Yangarra winemaker, Peter Fraser, amongst 'bush vine' grenache at Yangarra Estate. The pair have worked together for 20 years.